A comparison of the similarities and differences between the two theories of conscienceness

Being the first two formal theories introduced in psychology, both structuralism and functionalism have made a significant impact in the development of the subject. As far as the history of these two terms is concerned, structuralism was the first theory to be developed, and functionalism has been put forward as a response to structuralism. The main difference between structuralism and functionalism is that structuralism focuses on different brain elements and their capacities whereas functionalism is focused on the adaptation of human mind to different environments.

A comparison of the similarities and differences between the two theories of conscienceness

Maslow did so in the context of developmental psychology. He posited a five-stage hierarchy of needs that began with basic needs characterized as "physical" and progressed through stages including security needs, social needs, ego the need for power, influence, and recognition until arriving at what he called "self-actualization.

Each of these two theories sought to explain what motivates people. Maslow thought that each one of these stages had to be fulfilled, satisfied, or completed in order to move on to the next one.

Frederick Herzberg, whose study was published a few years after Maslow's in the s, imagined a two-factor model of motivational needs.

A comparison of the similarities and differences between the two theories of conscienceness

Herzberg, whose study was based on research in actual workplaces a key difference between his work and Maslow'sthought that that people were essentially motivated by two types of factors, or needs. The first was what he called "hygiene" needs, which included the basics like pay, work conditions, and job stability.

If these needs were not being met, a person would be unhappy at their job. In order to be happy at one's job, a series of "motivator" needs also had to be fulfilled.

These included finding value in one's work, feeling respected, and other similar needs. In short, both psychologists thought that certain needs had to be met in order for people to fulfill their potential and to develop.

Both emphasized versions of "self-actualization" as being more important than basic needs. But Herzberg, whose work was more grounded in hard research in workplaces, is generally regarded as more relevant to business management strategies.Jun 29,  · The trait and behavior leadership theories have several major similarities and a few differences as well.

Both theories see leadership potential as objective qualities that must be mastered. Transcript of Similarities and Differences Between the Theories of Motivat. Similarities and Differences Between the Theories of Motivation Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Herzberg's Two Factor Theory McClelland's Acquired Needs Theory Goal Setting Theory Similarities All separate theories work at creating motivation for the employee's.

The similarities are as follow: Both theories confer that a specific set of needs must be met in order to propiciate behavior, and maintain it. In Manslow's theory, it is through a Hierarchy of Needs.

What are the similarities and differences between the theories of Maslow and Herzberg? | eNotes

Being the first two formal theories introduced in psychology, both structuralism and functionalism have made a significant impact in the development of the subject.

As far as the history of these two terms is concerned, structuralism was the first theory to be developed, and functionalism has been put forward as a response to structuralism.

The two theories of learning discussed in this paper are behaviorism and constructivism. Behaviorists believed that “only observable, measurable, outward behavior .

Psychology versus Psychiatry: Similarities and Differences - A major misunderstanding that much of the lay public shares are what the differences are between the roles of Psychologists and Psychiatrists.

While much of what these two types of professionals do is similar in nature, there are also distinctive differences that the potential client needs to be aware of.

Psychology versus Psychiatry: Similarities and Differences