Kleos in the iliad

Etymology[ edit ] According to Gregory NagyKleos is a noun, derived from the verb kluein, which means 'hear'. For this, the person craving immortality—a condition proper only to the gods and antithetical to human existence—was totally reliant on poets and poetry.

Kleos in the iliad

More specifically, we are talking about Greek heroes or tragic heroes; some of you may already know that those two things are one in the same. To understand the Greek hero and, more importantly, kleos, we must first understand the Greek song culture and the role that lyrical poetry, specifically Homeric poetry, played in the lives of classical men and women.

Hero worship in ancient Greece was a cultural staple, and lyrical poetry was the medium through which stories of heroic myths were passed down through generations. The ancient Greeks would have understood the tales of Achilles, hero of The Iliad, or Odysseus, the namesake of The Odyssey, in the same way that the stories of Jesus Christ are known by much of Western civilization.

Moving on… So epic poetry was told, retold, and passed through the generations in the days of ancient Greece. It became something of a common thread within the ancient Hellenic society.

Kleos in the Iliad When we consider the Hero in ancient Greek culture, we must forget our notion of what a hero is. The ancient Greek concept of a . Homer's ''Iliad'' makes important use of the Greek concept of kleos, and you can see how much you know about kleos' place in the epic through this. Free Essay: Kleos in the Iliad When we consider the Hero in ancient Greek culture, we must forget our notion of what a hero is. The ancient Greek concept of.

For while Greece shared a common land mass, language, and religion, it was not one country. The tradition of reciting the Homeric epics and retelling the tales of Achilles, Agamemnon and Odysseus would have been a shared cultural tradition through all of Greece-from Athens to Sparta, Crete to Corinth.

That sounds all well and good. There are certainly worse ways spend an evening. Remember, we were talking about the tragic hero and his, or her, pursuit of kleos. So, first things first.

The first thing we should recognize is that there is not an exact translation for kleos. Kleos was the glory that was achieved by Homeric heroes who died violent, dramatic deaths on the field of battle.

However, kleos also referred to the poem or song that conveys this heroic glory. The Iliad, therefore, is a type of kleos. It is the song of Achilles, the main hero of the epic who achieved eternal glory on the battlefields of Troy.

Another name for the city of Troy was Ilium. However, kleos is not just something that is handed to you. You have to pursue it, often at great personal sacrifice. If I stay here and fight, I will not return alive but my name will live for ever kleos: It is that all-important question for classical heroes.

Do they die young and gloriously, and have their names live on forever? Or do they live long, humble lives, but die as anonymous old men?

In book XI, Homer takes something of a detour to tell us about the little known hero, Iphidamas. Here is a man who is an ally to King Priam and the Trojans; he was one of the first warriors to take up arms against the Acheans the Greeks when they set sail for Troy.

He is also the first warrior to face King Agamemnon in battle. Agamemnon kills him and strips his armor from his body. So there the poor fellow lay and slept the sleep of bronze, killed in the defence of his fellow-citizens, far from his wedded wife.

Iphidamas is just one more dead soldier in a great war? Why do I bother to bring him up?

Kleos in the iliad

Given the choice to stay and live in newlywed bliss or go and fight the Greeks, Iphidamas does not hesitate to abandon his newlywed wife to fight and die in battle. Why does he do it? You guessed it, for kleos. Achilles makes a similar choice. He does this knowing full well that with the death of Hector will signal the coming of his own untimely demise.

He presses on nonetheless. Achilles will not be denied his glory. Why Do Heroes Need Kleos? Some of you might be wondering what exactly is wrong with these ancient warriors.

Achilles storms off towards his certain death when he could just as easily live a long life back home. Iphidamas leaves his loving wife, opting instead to die on the battlefield.

Kleos in the iliad

They did it for kleos, for glory. Why was glory so important that these men would forfeit their lives to achieve it? Now that really is the question.Kleos In The Iliad Kleos in the Iliad When we consider the Hero in ancient Greek culture, we must forget our notion of what a hero is.

The ancient Greek concept of a hero was different from our own culture's. Kleos in the Iliad When we consider the Hero in ancient Greek culture, we must forget our notion of what a hero is. The ancient Greek concept of a hero was different from our own culture's.

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The motivation for any Homeric Greek is glory, or "Kleos", that is to be honored and respected among their people. Kleos Kleos (κλέος, "glory, fame") is the concept of glory earned in heroic battle. [24] For most of the Greek invaders of Troy, notably Odysseus, kleos is earned in a victorious nostos (homecoming).

Kleos in the Iliad When we consider the Hero in ancient Greek culture, we must forget our notion of what a hero is.

The ancient Greek concept of a hero was different from our own culture's. Kleos in the Iliad When we consider the Hero in ancient Greek culture, we must forget our notion of what a hero is.

The ancient Greek concept of a . Homer's ''Iliad'' makes important use of the Greek concept of kleos, and you can see how much you know about kleos' place in the epic through this.

Kleos - Wikipedia